Contact me for a free pdf chapter of my new book

               TABLE OF CONTENTS (FOR “HOME STUDY PROJECTS”)

Read the following outline and if you see a chapter you would like to read, contact me by email (rthomson@islandnet.com) and I will send you a free copy by wetransfer.com

The underlying themes of this book are (a) to inspire students to make the reading of challenging books part of their life-style; (b) to acquaint students with new fields (psychology, painting, popular songs) not usually taught in the language arts classroom; (c) to help students become aware of problems often encountered during adolescence and to give help them find ways to cope with these problems

1 USING FEATURE FILMS

A detailed comparison of feature films and books enables students to appreciate the strengths of each. Students learn how to write movie and book reports then, having mastered these, the path is open for them to write home-based reports on those movies and books that really interest them. Thirty-six movies suitable for class discussion or writing a movie report on.   p. 1

2 USING DOCUMENTARY MOVIES

Documentary films address many important subjects and to appreciate them fully it is important to know how to detect bias. Also, when students discover the works (miniseries and books) of some of today’s giants (Ken Burns, Michael Moore, Alex Haley, etc.) they broaden their knowledge and expand their vocabulary. p. 67

3 USING MAGAZINES AND NEWSPAPER ADVICE COLUMNISTS

Studying good magazine articles expands awareness and develops critical thinking skills. An insightful magazine article from Time magazine on the assassin of John Lennon introduces students to a useful discipline: abnormal psychology. From Ann Landers: some important lessons on how one’s family of origin can affect character. Reading a good advice columnist like Ann Landers clarifies many important issues in life and offers sensible solutions. Some entries are taken from the Ann Landers Encyclopedia.  p. 121

4 USING POPULAR SONGS TO INSPIRE STUDENTS TO WRITE

Some modern popular songs have beauty and depth. If they are presented to students as a cloze exercise they can be used to develop listening skills and review basics such as spelling. These can also be used as a bridge to poetry. Once students know how to analyze a song they are able to work at home on song-based projects.  p.157

5 THE MUSICAL AS MUSE

Some musicals combine beautiful music and well-chosen lyrics. “West Side Story” is such a musical. It has a lot to say about immigrants’ problems, gang violence and racism in America. The end of this chapter uses “West Side Story” as a pathway to exploring “Romeo and Juliet”.  p.209

6 USING PAINTINGS AND PHOTOGRAPHS TO INSPIRE STUDENTS TO WORK ON A PROJECT  

Famous paintings and interesting photos are used to stimulate class discussion. Students learn the rudiments of analyzing a painting and can use this knowledge to analyze paintings in a project. The main artist discussed is Norman Rockwell. p.241

7 ADOLESCENT CHALLENGES LOOKED AT THROUGH LITERATURE, FILM, SONGS AND PAINTINGS

This chapter looks at problems frequently experienced during adolescence. It uses several readings and some audio-visual methods to accomplish this. p.265 (contains great excerpts from Emily Carr and Alice Munro)

APPENDIX  (My Experiences Being Read to in School. Motivating Your Students to Read by Reading them Extracts from a Book: Papillon, by Henri Charrière. The Remarkable Story of How Alex Haley Succeeded in Finding Out the Details About His African Slave Ancestor, Kunta Kinte.  Teaching Some Shakespeare when You Have Little Time to Spare. A Step by Step Guide on How to Write an Essay or a Book.)

Index  p. 347

Bibliography p. 355

Other Publications by Godwin Books p.357

About the Author p.359

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